Gooseberry Hill artist Johannes Pannekoek looks to turn heads at Sculpture by the Sea

Johannes Pannekoek of Gooseberry Hill, with his Sculpture by the Sea artwork called Divergent. Photo: David Baylis
Johannes Pannekoek of Gooseberry Hill, with his Sculpture by the Sea artwork called Divergent. Photo: David Baylis

MULTI-AWARD winning sculptor Johannes Pannekoek often feels he’s “wrestling” with his work to get it to the point of “ecstasy”.

The Gooseberry Hill resident, whose sculptures are featured near Sydney Harbour and Crown Towers Perth, will exhibit his latest monstrous piece at Sculpture by the Sea from March 2-19.

For Pannekoek’s sixth exhibition at Cottesloe he’ll showcase Divergent, an abstract sculpture built out of weathering steel that will sustain the coastal elements and oxidise to add patterns to its surface.

The 2016 Bondi Sculpture by the Sea winner, who studied at the University of WA and Swan and Central TAFEs, has once again created a sculpture that is testament to his meticulous skills in design, engineering and material finish.

Pannekoek said Divergent, like his other work, was non-objective and was intended to be explored by viewers.

Johannes Pannekoek of Gooseberry Hill, with his Sculpture by the Sea artwork called Divergent. Photo: David Baylis

“I encourage people to take the time to wander in and around the sculpture,” he said.

“To explore the origin of each face and how the changing light conditions affect the form and to look through the eloquent hollows and negative spaces.

“I’d like them to wonder how the unusual oxidised patina has formed through the weathering process of water traversing by the force of gravity over each line, curve and incline.”

Pannekoek said assembling the complicated work of art was physically challenging and took a team of people.

“Producing such complicated work requires a lot of physical effort and some very challenging times particularly when I need to persuade the steel plate to bend into some tight forms,” he said.

“I feel I’m sometimes wrestling the work into shape and this wouldn’t be possible without a team of patient friends and tradesmen.

 

“There are always some agonising times during the fabrication process but the ecstasy in realising the work at full scale is always worth it.”

Pannekoek said his intention behind his work was to create unique pieces that were unpredictable, innovative and draw the viewer in by presenting several attractive views from within the one sculpture.

“I’m always inspired by what has come before and the past works of masters like Alexander Calder, Rudolf Belling, Henry Moore and Gaudi,” he said.

“Nature is also a strong source of inspiration particularly the Australian coastal and bush environments that we have the privilege to live in.”

MORE: Man charged with historical child sex offences

MORE: Baldivis named bankruptcy capital of Australia

MORE: For our children’s sake we need to act on the curse of social media