Helping Minds group helping carers


Jennie Fitzhardinge, Family Support Worker,  with Domenica Scuderi, Jane Forest and Sheila Higham and Marisa Carbone in a session.
Jennie Fitzhardinge, Family Support Worker, with Domenica Scuderi, Jane Forest and Sheila Higham and Marisa Carbone in a session.

HELPING Minds in Midland is running a psycho-educational group to help carers respond to the effects of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

Family Connections is a 12-session psycho-educational program developed by the National Education Alliance for BPD.

The program is designed for family members, partners or friends of people with BPD and based on behavioural therapy theory and skills.

The primary goal of the group is to help carers to gain knowledge and skills to improve their well-being and their relationship with those who have BPD.

Facilitated by a counsellor and a clinical psychologist, places are limited.

In Midland, dates for the sessions start on April 26 and run through to June 7at 6/9 The Avenue.

Co-ordinator Jennie Fitzhardinge said the sessions could improve family relationships.

“I am passionate about these groups because it can be so difficult to get the appropriate treatment for people who are suffering from this disorder,” she said.

“There is a lot of stigma around the diagnosis, particularly towards the families of the sufferers, as too often the families are blamed for the person’s condition.

“Current research and treatment recognises there is a genetic component to the disorder and that families aren’t necessarily at fault.”

Research suggests when families are involved, treatment outcomes are better for the person with the disorder.

Register here.