Mythical bush creature unveiled in Midland

L-R: Peter Dailey (Artist), David White (Mandy's Dad), Mandy White (Artist), Peter Zylstra (Program and Development Coordinator, DAADA) and Mallika Mcleod (Manager Participation, Arts and Health, DAADA). Photo: David Baylis
L-R: Peter Dailey (Artist), David White (Mandy's Dad), Mandy White (Artist), Peter Zylstra (Program and Development Coordinator, DAADA) and Mallika Mcleod (Manager Participation, Arts and Health, DAADA). Photo: David Baylis

THE final art installation of colourful mythical bush creatures has been unveiled as part of Midland Gate’s $100 million redevelopment.

The sculptures, affectionately named Oscar, Rosie and Buddy, were inspired by stories of playful mythical bush creatures passed down from Guildford-born Aboriginal artist Mandy White’s grandmother and mother.

These creatures are a strong theme for Ms White who primarily works in painting, drawing and printmaking.

The partnership between the shopping centre and the DAADA Midland Hub saw Ms White commissioned to create a unique sculptural art piece on the corner of Cale Street and The Crescent.

Midland Gate centre manager Alison Broadbent said it was a fulfilling community partnership that not only extended the City of Swan’s art trail but also complemented the centre’s newest public art installations by Chris Nixon and Beastman.

“Mandy’s sculptures are the vibrant culmination of our redevelopment’s public art project which includes large-scale murals on The Crescent and Lloyd Street,” she said.

This is Ms White’s first foray into sculpture with assistance from Bellevue-based body shop, Fusion Customs.

The sculptures are now a permanent fixture on Cale Street and form part of the Midland Gate’s entertainment and dining precinct.

More of Ms White’s work will be on display at the Midland Junction Arts Centre from February 15, 2019 as part of the Danjoo – Interwoven exhibition which is a celebration of Aboriginal culture, Country, language and visual arts.