Offenders desert CBD in droves

Superintendent Robert Anderson, Constable Tyron Roseveare and Snr Constable Rod Vinning,with Inspector Kim Massam and Snr Sergeant Craig Davis at the back. Picture: Bruce Hunt d421574
Superintendent Robert Anderson, Constable Tyron Roseveare and Snr Constable Rod Vinning,with Inspector Kim Massam and Snr Sergeant Craig Davis at the back. Picture: Bruce Hunt d421574

The area has seen its biggest drop in crime in years.

Last October, faced with an increasing number of burglaries, damage and disorderly conduct, Midland Police employed a more targeted approach that has seen remarkable results.

Two officers dedicated to the CBD beat full time laid hundreds of charges and issued 550 move on notices in the first six months.

The two officers mainly responsible for carrying out the task, Senior Constable Rod Vinning and Constable Tyron Roseveare, received a special commendation for their efforts from East Metropolitan District Superintendent Robert Anderson this week.

After eight months, the Midland arm of Operation Elektra has significantly decreased all types of crimes in Midland.

Remarkably, since the program started, disorderly conduct is down 58 per cent, burglaries have fallen 39 per cent and motor vehicle theft has dropped 38 per cent.

The three main target areas for the CBD team have been Midland Gate shopping centre, Centre Point Midland and Midland train station.

Midland Police Station Officer in Charge Senior Sergeant Craig Davis said demand for police attendance in the three locations had dropped by 12 per cent in the past six months.

‘The CBD is noticeably a more family inviting precinct and credit for this improvement in a large part must be given to Senior Constable Vinning and his team,’ he said.

‘Another key goal for the CBD team was to reduce complaints being received for anti-social behaviour.

Supt Anderson said he had not seen such a steep drop in crime during his career.

Sgt Vinning said mindsets were changing in Midland and families were starting to come back into the area.

‘People are realising that some behaviours are not acceptable. We used to find a job every 20 metres but now we need to hunt for the next job,’ he said.

‘The highlight came two months ago when we tended to a family who were always drinking on the streets and in parks, but instead they were sitting around enjoying ice creams at Midland Oval.’

‘Behaviours are changing’