Perfect recipe for better health

From Left: Jaqui Bruce (Nutrition student), Ros Sambell (Public Health coordinator and lecturer), Amanda Devine (Associate Professor) preparing for the launch of the new indigenous cook book
From Left: Jaqui Bruce (Nutrition student), Ros Sambell (Public Health coordinator and lecturer), Amanda Devine (Associate Professor) preparing for the launch of the new indigenous cook book

The North Metropolitan Health Service in consultation with more than 100 Aboriginal people developed More Deadly Tucker.

ECU nutrition staff and students analysed and tested recipes submitted by Aboriginal people and, if necessary, modified them so they met the nutritional content specified in the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

NMHS Aboriginal health director Cheryl Hayward said between 2006 and 2010, seven out of 10 deaths of indigenous people were attributed to chronic diseases.

‘Good food and nutrition helps protect us against cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer,’ she said.

‘The Aboriginal people we consulted expressed a need for recipes that are practical, pictorial and use familiar and readily available ingredients.’

ECU Associate Professor Amanda Devine said a key aim of More Deadly Tucker was to reduce the 10-year life expectancy gap between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

‘One of the main focuses of the book is to encourage portion control,’ she said.

‘Diagrams of different plate sizes are included in the book so readers can measure their plates against a standard size.

‘They can then compare each meal with a pictorial representation of each recipe to help develop self-regulation skills.’

Mary Ford, who submitted the Noongar steak stir-fry recipe, said she was already making good use of her copy of More Deadly Tucker.

For a copy, phone 9301 9209.