Truck numbers rocketing

An artist’s impression of Max Hipkins’ alternative proposal for Elizabeth Quay.
An artist’s impression of Max Hipkins’ alternative proposal for Elizabeth Quay.

Traffic data compiled by the City of Swan show one in five vehicles on some roads are hauling heavy freight.

Swan Chamber of Commerce president Joe Natoli described the figures as ‘frightening,’ and backed the chamber’s call to both political parties to commit to a fat-track upgrade of Lloyd Street in the run-up to next month’s State election.

The chamber and local businesses are conducting a high-profile campaign to have Lloyd Street extended from the Great Eastern Highway bypass to Bushmead Road.

The City traffic figures show the local road infrastructure in the Hazelmere area is in desperate need of an upgrade and more trucks are using surrounding roads.

Traffic counts from this month show a 42 per cent increase on Stirling Crescent in the past three years, with heavy trucks representing 22 per cent of all traffic.

‘There has been an 81 per cent increase in heavy haulage on Stirling Crescent since 2010,’ Mr Natoli said.

He said the data also revealed Bushmead Road experienced a 30 per cent increase in traffic since 2010, with 17 per cent heavy haulage.

‘That’s a 108 per cent increase in heavy haulage in just three years,’ he said.

Mr Natoli said fast tracking the Lloyd Street project was a ‘no brainer’ no matter who was elected next month.

Midland MLA Michelle Roberts said both parties supported the extension at both State and Federal levels.

‘We understand there are people that want the extension brought forward and it has been raised with Opposition transport spokesman Ken Travers,’ she said.

Last week, Transport Minister Troy Buswell told the Reporter he acknowledged the need for the southern extension of Lloyd Street but the government’s priority was a $57 million extension between Great Eastern Highway and Clayton Road.

It is understood the City of Swan met Main Roads WA last week to discuss Stage 1 of that project, which involves the construction of a bridge to allow Lloyd Street to pass beneath the railway line.