Alkimos Beach Primary School celebrates Japanese Culture Day

Kite flyng with Michael Alvares and students' own handmade kites. Photo: Aimee Webber
Kite flyng with Michael Alvares and students' own handmade kites. Photo: Aimee Webber

ALKIMOS Beach Primary School recently turned Japanese.

The inaugural Japanese Culture Day featured a kite festival and a morning of activities to replicate the Japanese public holiday Kodomo no Hi (Children’s Day).

Noah Dissington (Year 1) playing with a kendama toy.

“During this festival, families observe the 1000-year-old traditions of flying koinobori (carp fish kites) and putting Samurai dolls on display while they wish for their children to have a childhood filled with happiness and to grow up strong and independent,” teacher Terrena Hall said.

Chopstick challenges.

“Students made their own koinobori kites during art lessons and celebrated Children’s Day with 10 special cultural activities, such as costume dressing-up, craft activities, chopstick challenges and playing with various traditional toys and sports games.

Playing a game of tamaire.

“The finale for the day was an incursion by kite artisan Michael Alvares who talked about the many different types of Japanese kites before joining more than 300 students flying their own kites on the school oval.

Cruz Matekohi (Year 3) dressed in a Samurai costume.

“The huge success of this day has brought in high hopes for another successful school event exploring another aspect of Japanese culture next year.”

Josh Burton (Year 5) wearing a hachimaki headband and mastering the skill of using chopsticks.

Japanese lessons only started at Alkimos Beach for the first time earlier this year.

Safia Alasso (Year 3) enjoying the kite flying.