Butler: Indigenous advocate Rishelle Hume appointed Member of the Order of Australia


Rishelle Hume.
Rishelle Hume.

BEING the granddaughter of respected Aboriginal elders inspired Rishelle Hume to be a voice and advocate for the Indigenous community.

The Butler resident grew up with her grandparents, Noongar Whadjuk elders and founders of the Aboriginal Housing Board.

“Being around them as a kid, seeing people come and go and always helping others influenced me,” she said.

“Being young and peeling carrots and at that time, not knowing what I was doing, they instilled that in me to give back to the community.

“I do this to keep their legacy alive and ensure all Aboriginal people had a voice.”

Ms Hume has been involved with career development and employment opportunities for the Indigenous community for 25 years, including being the founder of the Yorga Djenna Leadership Program and as co-chair of WA Aboriginal Leadership Institute.

Yesterday she was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for her significant service to the Indigenous community of WA, particularly developing opportunities, promoting leadership and preserving culture.

Ms Hume said being awarded the Aboriginal award at the Western Australian of the Year Awards in 2016 was still one of her biggest achievements.

“For it to be awarded to a young Aboriginal female, I was 40 at the time, was unheard of as it’s typically awarded to older Aboriginal men,” she said.

“I feel like it’s an achievement for Aboriginal women within our state.

“Hopefully Aboriginal women can look at that and think ‘if she can do it, I can do it’,” she said.

“I’ll always do what I do to help others.”

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