Butler: neighbours fail to block apartments on Newmarket Pde


An artist’s impression of the Newmarket Parade apartments.
An artist’s impression of the Newmarket Parade apartments.

DEVELOPERS received planning approval for a 54-unit apartment block in Butler this month, despite neighbouring residents’ objections.

The North West Metropolitan Development Assessment Panel approved the $10.45 million plans for the Newmarket Parade block overlooking Marmion Avenue and Camborne Parkway on July 15.

TPG Town Planning submitted plans for a three and four-storey building on the 4453sq m site owned by the Housing Authority, on behalf of Diamond Health.

Residents lodged a 237-signature petition objecting to the plans in April, based on a perceived parking shortfall, height of the building and extra traffic it would generate.

MORE: Butler residents petition against apartment development on Newmarket Parade.

“There’s no leeway towards the people who were there first,” principal petitioner Gary Weston said.

“One or two storeys would be OK – not so much the third storey.”

Jacques Viljoen, whose house abuts the site, spoke at the DAP meeting, with concerns about the potential for people living in the units to see into his back yard and alfresco area.

“I just want us to compromise so I keep my privacy,” he said.

He also raised concerns about the location of the bin storage area.

In response, panel members added conditions to the 10 proposed in the City of Wanneroo’s staff recommendation, including that the windows overlooking his block be modified.

Although TPG director David Read said rubbish would be collected three times a week, the panel added a condition that the applicant review the site of the bin storage area and modify plans to provide a fully-enclosed structure.

Mr Read said the parking layout exceeded the number of bays required, with 74 provided including 10 for visitors.

He said it was the type of “development that should be encouraged to provide housing diversity in the precinct” featuring 47 two-bedroom units and seven three-bedroom units.

After panel member Paul Dreschler raised concerns about the potential heat created by the roofing over parking bays, Mr Read agreed to consider materials that would reduce heat during the detailed design stage and landscaping solutions.

While most development applications receive a two-year approval period for works to start, this application received four years – Mr Read said they requested the extra time due to the current market conditions.