Chicken hitches caravan ride from Margaret River

Judy Hay and her dog Missy look on as their newest travel companion Chook Chook has a peck in the grass.  Picture: Martin Kennealey        www.communitypix.com.au   d446355
Judy Hay and her dog Missy look on as their newest travel companion Chook Chook has a peck in the grass. Picture: Martin Kennealey        www.communitypix.com.au d446355

MEET Chook Chook, the Margaret River hen who hitched a lift with an unsuspecting caravanning couple so she could travel around Australia.

The farm chicken saw her chance to embrace a free-range lifestyle when Judy and Greg Hay briefly stopped in at Margaret River Hideaway before driving on to Busselton on October 24.

Originally from the Gold Coast, the couple noticed people laughing as they reached the coastal town but didn’t understand why.

Mrs Hay said when they pulled into a car park, a man asked “do Queenslanders always carry their livestock like that?”

“We go around the back of the car and there was the chook sitting on the hitch of the caravan,” she said.

Mrs Hay said they couldn’t believe the hen had hung on throughout the 80km drive.

“We were going at about 100km/h almost all the way,” she said.

The farm stay owners said the Hays could keep the hen, which has become a travel buddy for their border collie, Missy (15), and now has her own cage to sleep in at night.

“She takes herself to bed every day,” Mrs Hay said.

“We don’t call it a cage – we call it a bedroom because we don’t like caged eggs.

“She lays an egg every day.

“Nothing seems to worry her, she is so placid.”

The couple have been staying with relatives, the Neveldsens, in Carabooda this month and will soon head east again.

“We’ve got to go back to the Gold Coast for Christmas and introduce her to the rest of the family,” Mrs Hay said.

Host Pat Neveldsen said it sounded like the hen was determined to go on holiday, and they had enjoyed having her and her companions stay.

As they travel, the Hays have been taking photos of Chook Chook at tourist sights, such as the heart sculpture in Mandurah.

“The chook has blended in pretty well, and everywhere we go, people hear the story,” Mr Hay said.