Mindarie yarning circle brings Aboriginal culture to early learning

Mindarie yarning circle brings Aboriginal culture to early learning

A MINDARIE child care centre has created a yarning circle as part of its reconciliation action plan.

Keiki Early Learning Mindarie Keys held an official launch of the yarning circle in its Kindy garden on March 29.

Aboriginal elder Mort Hansen performed a Welcome to Country ceremony for the launch and a didgeridoo demonstration.

He was accompanied by his wife Vivien and Aboriginal early years consultant Isabelle Adams, and about 40 children, families and staff attended the event.

It was part of the centre’s ongoing reconciliation action plan to build stronger connections with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The family-owned company also held a professional development event for staff in March, presented by Ms Adams, to improve educators’ knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and culture as well as assist create culturally safe environments.

“We believe it is very important to respect and value all cultures and are inclusive and welcoming to all,” centre owner Sam Morrell said.

“It is particularly important that we teach our children about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

“We do this through play and fun experiences such as singing ‘Wanjoo’ meaning welcome which is sung in Noongar, the local Aboriginal dialect.

“Singing ‘Wanjoo’ helps children understand the importance of acknowledging and respecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.”

For more information, visit keikiearlylearning.com.au.