Northern suburbs students recognised at Fred Hollows Humanity Award presentation ceremony


Youth Minister Peter Tinley with Fred Hollows Humanity Award recipients Julia Taylor, Katie Green and Derrick Goonting and The Fred Hollows Foundation founding director Gabi Hollows.

Youth Minister Peter Tinley with Rory Coplin and Gabi Hollows.

Fred Hollows Humanity Award recipients with Gabi Hollows and Youth Minister Peter Tinley.
Youth Minister Peter Tinley with Fred Hollows Humanity Award recipients Julia Taylor, Katie Green and Derrick Goonting and The Fred Hollows Foundation founding director Gabi Hollows. Youth Minister Peter Tinley with Rory Coplin and Gabi Hollows. Fred Hollows Humanity Award recipients with Gabi Hollows and Youth Minister Peter Tinley.

SEVERAL northern suburbs children received recognition for their compassion, integrity and kindness at the Fred Hollows Humanity Award presentation ceremony recently.

The national initiative acknowledges Year 6 students who demonstrate humanitarian values and expanded into WA this year.

Youth Minister Peter Tinley and The Fred Hollows Foundation founding director Gabi Hollows presented students with their certificates at the Constitutional Centre of WA.

Recipients included Peter Moyes Anglican Community School students Rory Coplin, Amelie White and Keala Crawley as well as Mercy College’s Derrick Goonting, Julia Taylor from Liwara Catholic Primary School and Katie Green from Goollelal Primary School.

“If the aspirations of the young people here today and their enthusiasm, sense of service and compassion are anything to go by, then I’m certain that the future of WA is in good hands,” Mr Tinley said.

Ms Hollows said it was great to meet students who were making a positive difference in their communities.

Rory was nominated for the compassion he shows for those less fortunate than himself.

By running a chocolate box at his father’s workplace, Rory raised more than $6000 for World Vision to buy farm animals for families in developing countries.

Amelie was described as being a fair and grounded student who never takes sides and always lets others be heard.

She idolises Jane Goodall and is passionate about raising awareness for animal rights.

The nomination for Keala said she was a compassionate and considerate child who went out of her way to help others in need, by making sure they were okay, had the basics in water, food and clothing.

Derrick was described as a kind-heated, fun-loving person who got along with everyone, was polite, inclusive of others, and showed respect and compassion for all those around him.

He has a great sense of humour and always greets people with a smile, making them feel welcome and accepted.

Julia was nominated for being genuine, caring and kind to everyone she meets as well as loving animals and using her own initiative to fundraise for animal conservation.

Katie, who is legally blind, goes out of her way to anticipate the needs of others and provide support.

She is part of her school’s environment leadership team and has a strength for making younger students feel valued and important by including them in projects that involve the whole school.

The Fred Hollows Humanity Award will return to WA in 2018.

Visit www.hollows.org/humanityaward.

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