Peter Moyes Anglican Community School students make principals stick to their word on reading challenge


Abby Palmer-Smith, Mannix jones with Teacher Roderick Wood, Layla Vickery, Christian Porter and Isabella Holl. Picture: Matt Jelonek d477057
Abby Palmer-Smith, Mannix jones with Teacher Roderick Wood, Layla Vickery, Christian Porter and Isabella Holl. Picture: Matt Jelonek d477057

STAFF found themselves in a sticky situation at a Mindarie school recently after students rose above a reading challenge.

Primary students at Peter Moyes Anglican Community School opted to duct tape teachers to walls after surpassing their target in the principal’s reading challenge, which tasked them with reading for 250,000 minutes in six weeks.

Enthusiastic students from Pre-Kindergarten to Year 6 surpassed that target, reading for a total of 257,727 minutes with a week to spare.

Reading Challenge at Peter Moyes Anglican Commuinity School. Picture: Matt Jelonek d477057

As an incentive, the students got to choose an activity that the primary school principal and deputy principal would undertake from three options: to have their principals dress up and sing a song, become human sundaes or be ‘duct taped’ to a wall.

On November 30, the class that read the most minutes during the challenge used duct tape to ‘stick’ their principals to a wall at the school while other classes watched.

Principal Roderick Wood said students and their parents were eager to participate in the challenge, which made the prize challenge more rewarding.

Reading Challenge at Peter Moyes Anglican Commuinity School. Picture: Matt Jelonek d477057

“We had feelings of trepidation about the prize challenge to begin with, but with all the excitement and atmosphere coming from seeing the students eager to read as much as possible, our worries disappeared,” he said.

“We took on the prize challenge bravely and knew it was for a worthy cause in seeing all our students and their families take up the reading challenge with such enthusiasm.”

The aim of the reading challenge was to demonstrate the benefits of reading at least 20 minutes per day, including the development of a broader vocabulary and increased general knowledge.

It also encouraged parents and children to have conversations at home about what they were reading.

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