Roving MHR keeps ear to the ground

Lancelin Primary School student Thomas Barrett, Pearce MHR Christian Porter, student Georgia McDiarmi and deputy principal Katie Hosking.
Lancelin Primary School student Thomas Barrett, Pearce MHR Christian Porter, student Georgia McDiarmi and deputy principal Katie Hosking.

ABOUT 20 residents have attended coffee catch-ups to talk about infrastructure, education, broadband and tax with Pearce MHR Christian Porter.

Mr Porter met about 40 people in Lancelin, 10 in Guilderton and 20 in Yanchep in July, who raised their concerns with him.

“In Lancelin, the key issues that arose included tourism infrastructure, including the proposed tourist park and boat ramp, mobile black spots, electricity supply and funding of other local infrastructure,” he said.

“In Guilderton, the residents were keen to discuss the quality of the education system, attracting people to stay in the local area, medical services, age pension changes, immigration and the rollout of the NBN.”

The Yanchep resident said the topics in that area varied from the closure of Club Capricorn to GST, local security, abuse of the welfare system, the age pension, disability support payments, terrorism, politicians’ pay, Asian infrastructure and halal certification.

Mr Porter also visited Lancelin Primary School where students asked what he was like as a child, his favourite part of the job and flight times.

“I went to Wembley Downs Primary School and sat at chairs and tables similar to yours and wore uniforms very similar to yours,” he said.

“It just goes to show that you can do anything, even become a politician.

“I get to do lots of different and interesting things – I get to come and visit kids like you, but I’ve also been given the opportunity to travel overseas.

“We fly at all times of the day. Sometimes I stay up all night to fly from Perth to the eastern states.”

When visiting Two Rocks Primary School, students asked him why women were not allowed to vote for so long.

“Because people were old-fashioned. It should have happened a lot earlier than it did,” he said.

Another student asked whether there was a law that allowed girls to hit boys, but not vice versa.

“There is no such law. Nobody is allowed to hit anybody,” Mr Porter said.

“As an ex-state prosecutor, I can tell you that touching anyone without their consent is assault.

“So bullying and touching anyone without their permission is very, very wrong.”