Somerly PS helps launch Youth Jam Radio’s breakfast broadcasts


Isaac Mulcrone (16), radio DJ and founder of Youth Jam Radio, pictured during broadcast at Somerly Primary School. Picture: Marie Nirme d474290
Isaac Mulcrone (right, 16), radio DJ and founder of Youth Jam Radio, pictured during broadcast at Somerly Primary School with Zoe Baxter (16) and Jack Smallacombe (17). Picture: Marie Nirme d474290
Somerly Primary’s school band Sound Squad performing during Youth Jam Radio’s live broadcast from the school. (L-R) Will Lovett (11), Daeniel Munar (11), Aidan Sazali (11), Mkenji Jean (10) and Andrew Khomoutov (11). Picture: Marie Nirme d474290
Isaac Mulcrone (16), radio DJ and founder of Youth Jam Radio, pictured during broadcast at Somerly Primary School. Picture: Marie Nirme d474290 Isaac Mulcrone (right, 16), radio DJ and founder of Youth Jam Radio, pictured during broadcast at Somerly Primary School with Zoe Baxter (16) and Jack Smallacombe (17). Picture: Marie Nirme d474290 Somerly Primary’s school band Sound Squad performing during Youth Jam Radio’s live broadcast from the school. (L-R) Will Lovett (11), Daeniel Munar (11), Aidan Sazali (11), Mkenji Jean (10) and Andrew Khomoutov (11). Picture: Marie Nirme d474290

YOUTH Jam Radio is getting youngsters ready for the weekend with its fortnightly school broadcasts.

The #feelgoodfriday breakfast show was launched at Somerly Primary School last month, which will see the radio station broadcast live between 6am and 9am every two weeks from a school in Perth.

“It involves interacting with the children, teachers and community,” general manager Isaac Mulcrone said.

“It’s about waking up early with a smile, talking to kids and enabling them to learn through fun activities and involves Youth Jam Radio be the positive influence it is named.

“We also provide hot beverages to the kids on cold days.”

The 16-year-old, who started Youth Jam Radio earlier this year, said the broadcast was “a lot of set up” but it was “definitely worth it”.

“We arrived at Somerly Primary at 5am to set up, do off-air sound checks and set everything up,” he said.

“It takes us roughly 40 minutes to set up, which leaves us five minutes to get our on-air team briefed and ready to go.”

As part of the broadcast, students were able to go on air and be radio hosts, the school rock band performed and others were able to showcase their talents.

Forte School of Music Joondalup was also part of the broadcast.

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