Star trek at an end

Bella and Hans Wunderlin prepare to bid a sad farewell to the Gingin Observatory. Picture: Bruce Hunt d406782
Bella and Hans Wunderlin prepare to bid a sad farewell to the Gingin Observatory. Picture: Bruce Hunt d406782

Mrs Wunderlin said they had reluctantly put the business back on the market after she was diagnosed with the hereditary condition, common variable immune deficiency (CVID).

‘We are not able to cope (but) it is sad, like giving up a baby,’ she said.

Mrs Wunderlin said she had been getting tired and found her thinking ‘wasn’t 100 per cent’ before she was diagnosed.

‘I couldn’t see properly, I couldn’t hear properly, I couldn’t breath properly,’ she said.

Since her diagnosis, the Quinns Rocks resident has been receiving iron infusions every four weeks and said she received a lot of support from the Immune Deficiency Foundation of Australia.

‘Not many people know about CVID ” a lot of people have it and don’t even realise,’ Mrs Wunderlin said.

‘I’ve been tracing down my family history because it is hereditary and trying to tell all my family.’

The Gingin Observatory is next to the Gravity Discovery Centre and includes a lease, five telescopes, and staff with a passion for stars, according to Mrs Wunderlin.

‘We have a great galaxy team who are the true grit of the business,’ she said.

‘It is an unusual business and once the right person gets hold of it, it will bloom.’

Although they will part with the business for $200,000 or the nearest offer, Mrs Wunderlin said their love for astronomy would continue.

‘It doesn’t stop me from doing astronomy because it is in my blood now,’ she said.

For more information about the Immune Deficiency Foundation, visit www.idfaustralia.org.