Students driven to restore classic Australian car

Design and Technology teacher Tom Adams with Year 12 students Meg Robinson, Bobby Potter, Damon Eddie, Luke Willemsen, Jack McDonald, Rob Roach, Ben Darbyshire and Ebony Paul. Picture: Martin Kennealey          d441550
Design and Technology teacher Tom Adams with Year 12 students Meg Robinson, Bobby Potter, Damon Eddie, Luke Willemsen, Jack McDonald, Rob Roach, Ben Darbyshire and Ebony Paul. Picture: Martin Kennealey        d441550

Clarkson Community High School has invested in a 1964 EH Holden ute for its Year 12 automotive students to repair and refurbish.

Principal John Young said the school bought the ute off Gumtree for about $5000, including delivery, and he hoped the students would enjoy working on an iconic Australian vehicle.

�There�s a certain romance here; it�s a bit of nostalgia and Australian connection,� he said.

Mr Young said the project, expected to take a few years, would allow students to learn skills including engine work, welding, panel beating, spray painting, upholstery repair and chrome restoration.

�The body is not bad, they will just do a traditional paint job on it,� he said.

Automotive teacher Tom Adams joined the school earlier this year and said projects like this would not be cheap, so the school welcomed donations of parts from businesses.

Mr Adams said there were 14 students in the class and they would focus on the panels first before restoring the original engine and the replacement one that was currently under the hood.

�We are getting an engine stand so we can work on the original engine separately,� he said �We started her up the other day and the shed filled up with smoke.�

Mr Adams said while some students had experience working on cars, others did not and were already learning to design basic tools using the school�s 3D printers.

�They learn the use of different types of tools in the automotive trade,� he said.

�The intention is to give them basic skills and knowledge, even if they only use it for their own benefit on their own cars when they get them.�

Technology and enterprise co-ordinator John Keyworth said the school also hoped to improve attendance by offering different projects.

�It�s a good incentive for kids to turn up,� he said. �I would have loved to have done this when I was at school.�

Year 12 student Luke Willemsen (17) said he enjoyed the project, having worked on cars with his father.

�It makes me want to come back next year after I�ve finished school just to work on it,� the Two Rocks resident said.

�I wouldn�t mind having some cars of my own to work on.

�I like the older model cars.�