Belmont’s Ngalla Maya to train and education more former Indigenous inmates after receiving grant


Ngalla Maya founder Mervyn Eades, business development manager Aaron Baker and his daughter Zeniah Woods happily receive the money from Impact100 Fremantle.
Ngalla Maya founder Mervyn Eades, business development manager Aaron Baker and his daughter Zeniah Woods happily receive the money from Impact100 Fremantle.

BELMONT organisation Ngalla Maya will be able deliver training and education to former Indigenous inmates in Fremantle after receiving a $100,000 grant.

The organisation received the money as part of the Impact100 Fremantle project, which asks 100 donors to each to contribute $1000 annually to help charities and projects.

Ngalla Maya founder Mervyn Eades said the grant would allow the organisation to do work in Fremantle three days per week.

“We’ll have a small vehicle to make house visits and be able to hire an employee,” he said.

“This will allow us to do the same training and work we’ve been doing around Belmont and help people gain employment and give them hope.

“Fremantle is an important area because lots of our boys and girls live around Coolbellup and Hamilton Hill.”

Mr Eades said his he was thankful to Impact100 Fremantle for the grant.

“I was happy enough to be in the final four but I felt overwhelmed that Ngalla Maya was the major grant recipient,” he said.

“Our program has been a huge success but I’d like to see us based in Armadale, Mirrabooka and all through the city and regional areas.

“I’d say that 230 or 240 people have come through the program and 140 of those have been able to secure employment.

“The money will allow us to continue delivering the program in a culturally sensitive way to our people.”

The three other finalists Fremantle PCYC, MyKy and Koora Wadi Supported Playgroup each received $5000.

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