Cleaner feared the worst in alleged vigilante attack

Stock image.
Stock image.

THE victim of an alleged vigilante attack thought he was going to die when two men punched and assaulted him with a hockey stick, the WA District Court heard yesterday.

Brett Christopher O’Dea and Jacob Jefferson Webb are on trial accused of assaulting bowls club cleaner Alimamy Koroma, 35, with a hockey stick on Griffin Crescent, Manning.

Mr Koroma was left with a traumatic brain injury and fractures to his skull, face and ankle after the alleged attack on January 20 last year.

He now lives at a brain injury rehabilitation centre and receives ongoing assistance from psychologists and speech therapists.

Manning Bowls Club on Challenger Ave. Picture: Google Maps.

During witness examination by prosecutor Jason Chu, Mr Koroma confirmed he needed help with daily activities when he was admitted to hospital and had to re-learn how to talk and count.

The men allegedly assaulted the Manning Bowls Club cleaner as he was chasing a girl who broke into the bowls club.

The two accused believed the girl was being attacked by Mr Koroma, who appeared via video link from a remote room.

Mr Koroma said he arrived at the Manning Bowls Club through the front entrance at about 1.30am on January 20 last year and did his duties before going in to an office.

He said the cupboards were open and cashbox was on the floor which prompted him to walk around and check the area, finding a girl in the men’s bathroom.

“I saw her in the men’s bathroom… she opened the back door, she runs,” he said.

Brett Christopher O’Dea and Jacob Jefferson Webb are on trial accused of assaulting bowls club cleaner.

Mr Koroma said he shouted “thief, thief” as he chased after her, and she ran off to the driveway of a house.

The two co-accused allegedly came out, one of them holding a hockey stick.

Mr Koroma said he saw the two men and the next thing he remembered was being on the ground.

“I told them, I said, ‘this girl went to the office, thief!’,” he said.

“They were punching me on my face, my back, everywhere.”

During the cross-examination with Mr O’Dea’s lawyer Melissa Louw, Mr Koroma denied he tried to run away when he saw the two men and said he didn’t hear the the men telling him to stay put.

Mr Koroma said he had no memory of how the men approached him and if it wasn’t for the police being there, he might be killed.

“(The two men) were on top of me… my mouth sealed, I can’t talk,” he said.

Neighbouring residents on Griffin Crescent testified they heard a “blood-curdling” scream at about 2.30am.

The trial continues.