Cloverdale: concerns raised about damage to Wright St from tree roots


Former councillor Paul Hitt. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au d476093
Former councillor Paul Hitt. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au d476093

CONCERNS about the state of Wright Street in Cloverdale have been raised.

Former Belmont councillor Paul Hitt voiced his worries during October’s council meeting about the impact tree roots were having on the road surface near the median strip on the road and the safety risks it poised for drivers and pedestrians.

Mr Hitt told the Southern Gazette that it was an issue the council should not ignore.

“Staff from the City would drive along this road every day and they should be proactive about it,” he said.

“There should be an incentive scheme in place if they report the issue then they get rewarded.

“The roots from the trees have raised the road surface near the median strip; I think there are concerns from the community, particular because the problem has occurred near parks where children play sport.

“With the new laws that mean drivers need to keep their distance from cyclists it means people will have to encroach closer to the median strip.”

Belmont chief executive John Christie said the council had undertaken road improvement projects on Wright Street in recent years but none related to damage from tree roots.

“Three locations in Wright Street have been identified where damage caused by the existing trees will require remediation works in the very near future,” he said.

“A full audit has been conducted to assess any damage to Wright Street caused by tree growth and apart from the three locations identified, all other locations will be monitored into the future and maintenance will be carried out when required.

“The more mature trees in Wright Street causing some conflict with the road are spotted gums which were planted approximately 20 plus years ago.

“This tree species is still considered appropriate for planting in the streetscape however, using today’s improved planting techniques and technologies, the potential for conflict with infrastructure would be reduced.”

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