Clubs spearhead drug fight


Greyhounds WA chief David Hobbs, Manning Rippers vice-president Scott Greer, Swan MHR Steve Irons, Manning Rippers president Michael Tindall and Rodney Bridge. Picture: Marie Nirme           d449111
Greyhounds WA chief David Hobbs, Manning Rippers vice-president Scott Greer, Swan MHR Steve Irons, Manning Rippers president Michael Tindall and Rodney Bridge. Picture: Marie Nirme         d449111

Sports clubs will be part of the grassroots campaign in the National Ice Action Strategy through the Good Sports program.

The program already promotes the responsible consumption of alcohol in about 7000 sporting clubs but will receive the extra funding over four years to promote the message against ice.

Swan MHR Steve Irons said the Good Sports program reached South Perth Cricket Club and Manning Rippers Football Club with many more clubs showing support for the cause.

“Extending the program to educate about ice will help convince young people not to try the drug through learning about it from peers in an environment they trust,” Mr Irons said.

“If we can spread this message at the local level and let the community take action it will have a bigger effect.”

Mr Irons said bringing the message against ice to future sporting stars was the best place to start.

“If we encourage young people, our future sporting champions, to stay away from illicit drugs then there will be less influence in our community,” he said.

“Having sport clubs, coaches and role models promote these messages to young players will have a big impact on the way they look at drugs and alcohol which will extend to peers outside the sport group and into the wider community.”

South Perth Cricket Club president Steve Barry said it was important for local clubs to raise awareness on the issues associated with illicit drugs and alcohol.

Manning Rippers Football Club president Michael Tindall said the positive message needed to be enforced by people that young athletes looked up to and trusted.

“If young players are tempted later on in life hopefully they can look back and remember where we stood and the messages and lessons we taught them when they first entered the sport,” Mr Tindall said.

The program hopes to prevent further drug-related deaths in young people.

Not-for-profit organisation Sideffect was formed when promising footballer Preston Bridge fell from a balcony and died after taking a synthetic LSD.

Rod Bridge, Preston’s father, formed the organisation after Preston (16) died in 2013, and attracted a range of members, including Greyhounds WA chief executive David Hobbs.