Film carries message for teen girls drinking alcohol

Film carries message for teen girls drinking alcohol

IN an effort to combat underage and binge drinking, the Theatrical Response Group of the Constable Care Child Safety Foundation has launched #emilywasted ⿿ a thought-provoking interactive film campaign aimed at teenage girls.

The first in a series of interactive movies allows viewers to make decisions in relation to choices offered and thus decide the fate of the main character Emily.

There are four outcomes: Emily being taken to hospital in an ambulance, Emily being arrested, Emily saving her friend from being attacked, or Emily vomiting all over herself and unable to help her friend.

The aim is to educate young people on the serious effects underage drinking can have.

According to DrinkWise Australia, drinking alcohol as a teen increases the risks of short-term and long-term harm to health.

The website, which offers advice for parents and teens, said binge drinking was referred to as drinking continuously for a number of days or weeks, occasional or irregular bouts of heavy drinking or drinking deliberately to get drunk.

Risks associated with binge drinking include memory loss, injury, diarrohea, vomiting, lack of judgment and alcohol poisoning.

With younger school leavers, it is likely teenagers will attend parties where alcohol is present before they turn 18.

According to DrinkWise, teenagers may think an alcohol-free party is boring and place pressure on adults to supply drinks.

It said that many parents believed allowing kids to drink at home would help demystify alcohol, but research showed that this was not necessarily correct.

“Allowing a drink at home can be seen as approval of alcohol, lowering the barriers for teens to drink in other environments,” it said.

South East Metropolitan Community Engagement Co-ordinator Sergeant Matt Sharp said WA Police have a zero tolerance approach to underage drinking.

“If your teenager is planning on hosting a party, be proactive and plan ahead,” he said.

“Don’t supply alcohol, make sure adults are there to supervise all the time, even consider checking bags as guests arrive, just to make sure nobody is sneaking alcohol in.

“Talk to them as young adults, but remember to set clear boundaries and outline your expectations before the party starts.”

Register a party online at www.police-.wa.gov.au up to 28 days before the event.