IGA demolition an inconvenience for Carlisle community


Teresa Joslin, mother of Benjamin (4) and Amelia (3), out front of a group of concerned local
residents. Picture: Jon Hewson        www.communitypix.com.au   d466185
Teresa Joslin, mother of Benjamin (4) and Amelia (3), out front of a group of concerned local residents. Picture: Jon Hewson        www.communitypix.com.au d466185

MEMBERS of the Carlisle community are trying to save their local IGA from being demolished and replaced by a fast food restaurant and a service station.

A plan to remove the Carlisle IGA and Muzz Buzz on the corner of Orrong Road and Archer Street and replace it with a Hungry Jack’s and 7-Eleven service station and convenience store has been created by town planning consultancy business Peter Webb and Associates on behalf of the land owners Universal Enterprises Pty Ltd.

The Southern Gazette spoke with residents who opposed the development because it would mean their beloved local store would go and reduce access to everyday grocery items, create congestion, reduce parking bays and mean that two large marri trees would be cut down.

Carlisle resident Ronhhda Potter said she was concerned about the community’s ability to access fresh food if the IGA was demolished.

“It will mean people will need to travel to Belmont Forum or the Parks Centre, which means using public transport, although that’s difficult for some residents because their movement is restricted,” she said.

“When you look at the product list, it’s items like Kripsy Kreme and slushies.

“You also have to question whether you need a service station when there is already one across the road.”

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Ms Potter said more than 100 submissions had gone to the Town of Victoria Park, with the majority of them negative.

“The proposal means there will be fewer parking bays; currently there are about 60 bays but the proposal will mean there will be about 26,” she said.

“An elderly couple who live next to the area, their bedroom would be just 5m from the Hungry Jacks drive-thru.”

Teressa Thai, whose family owns the IGA, said they had been leasing the building on a month-to-month basis from MLV Real Estate but were never given to opportunity to have a longer lease.

“We know the shop is not in the best state but there was no way we could have made changes that would have cost $200,000 to $300,000 without a longer lease,” she said.

“We know the store looks dodgy on the outside but inside we are friendly and it’s a community hub.”

The development is expected to be considered at the Metro Central Joint Development Assessment Panel meeting in April.