Residents push for a clear vision

CONCERN that South Perth will have �skyscrapers everywhere like New York City� has created heated debate between residents and council.

Mill Point Road residents are taking action against what they claim is lack of planning by the City of South Perth in favour of developers.

A group of more than 300 residents calling themselves the �Save the South Perth Peninsula� group gathered outside the site of the proposed 29-storey development at 74 Mill Point Road on April 11 to put their case against the development to City councillors.

�The whole process has had pathetic community consultation right from the start,� meeting organiser and local resident Terry Hogan said.

�We are not against development or the idea of exciting new shops, we are upset and angry with council staff throwing town planning over to the developers,� he said.

South Perth Mayor Sue Doherty said the development was not a result of poor planning.

�Residents have had the opportunity to be involved and contribute to the amendment to the Town Planning Scheme, creating the South Perth Station Precinct throughout the entire planning process,� she said.

�There has been a significant amount of community consultation.�

Residents� concerns include the removal of trees, views of Kings Park being blocked, increased traffic on Mill Point Road, the high water table and potential damage to the Old Mill precinct.

�There is no vision about what the area will look like in 100 years,� Mr Hogan said.

�Will we have skyscrapers everywhere, like New York City, on what is supposed to be an area of low-rise development, which was supposed to have a limit of eight-storey developments to preserve a low profile coastline?

�It is ad-hoc development with no master plan.�

The group will present a 300-signature petition to the City.

South Perth MLA John McGrath said he would continue to listen to resident�s concerns and monitor the situation at a state level.

South Perth council has called a special electors meeting for 6pm on Wednesday, May 6, to discuss residents� concerns about the issue.