Residents refuse to give up fight to keep Brearely Avenue open amidst looming closure


Redcliffe residents Peter Crookes, Sue Pethick and Bella Scharfenstein and East Metropolitan MLC Samantha Rowe are continuing their campaign to keep Brearely Avenue open.
Redcliffe residents Peter Crookes, Sue Pethick and Bella Scharfenstein and East Metropolitan MLC Samantha Rowe are continuing their campaign to keep Brearely Avenue open.

A GROUP of Redcliffe residents are not giving up their fight to keep Brearely Avenue open despite Transport Minister Dean Nalder saying it will close.

They say traffic conditions are worsening, particularly along Great Eastern Highway and nearby streets.

Sue Pethick said cars were running red lights at the Fauntleroy Avenue intersection due to constant congestion.

“It is taking so long to get through those lights now,” she said.

“On First Street cars are backed up to the primary school in afternoons and people are taking great risks.”

Bella Scharfenstein said there were concerns about the safety of students from two schools on Stanton Road, which would see an increase in traffic volume if Brearely Avenue was closed.

Ms Scharfenstein said traffic conditions would worsen in the area with the development of commercial precincts and the new Direct Factory Outlet.

They called for more comprehensive local traffic studies to get a more accurate picture of what impact the closure would have on adjacent roads.

Transport Minister Dean Nalder said the section of the road east of First Street would be closed by the end of this year.

“In the meantime, interim access for local traffic only will be maintained on Brearley Avenue between Great Eastern Highway and First Street,” he said.

A review by Main Roads WA would be carried out for the remaining section, but its results would not be available until the second quarter of next year, after the March 2017 State Election.

East Metropolitan MLC Samantha Rowe said Mr Nalder had decided that the road would be closed despite widespread community objections.

“Residents have long been concerned about the impact of the closure of Brearley Avenue on traffic throughout the local area and reasonable access to local homes and businesses,” Ms Rowe said.

“They are not happy with the Liberal State Government’s handling of this issue to date.

“The Minister is asking residents to vote for his government and trust that a solution will be found after the State Election.

“But many find this is ridiculous given his unwillingness so far to work towards a solution that meets the needs of the community.”

On June 16, opposition transport spokeswoman Rita Saffioti delivered a grievance motion to Parliament.

“The idea that we will not get a response until the second quarter of next year is abysmal and we need more action,” Ms Saffioti said.

She said residents’ main concerns included increased density, road closures, the impact on businesses and the creation of rat runs.

Mr Nalder said the real impact of the closure on traffic patterns would not be known until the start of the 2017 school year in February.

Main Roads would then analyse traffic movements in the area with the modified road network.

“We do not know what will come from that [until] after the election,” he said.

“Whoever is responsible for the portfolio and whoever is in government can make those appropriate decisions.”