Anger over tree removal

North Beach resident Jack Lee with trees that are destined to be chopped down. Picture: Marcus Whisson
North Beach resident Jack Lee with trees that are destined to be chopped down. Picture: Marcus Whisson

The city has removed 10 trees from Charles Riley Memorial Reserve in North Beach as part of the first of four major developments at the reserve.

The developments include the construction of a multi-use community building and the extension of the car park next to the building.

Community parkland in the northwest corner of the reserve will be developed and the existing northern junior oval extended into a senior oval.

Mr Lee said the Australian Rules club had one large pitch and a second smaller playing area, so another pitch was not needed.

‘The club wants a second maxisized pitch, which would destroy the whole ambience of the reserve,’ he said.

‘I, along with many other local residents, are appalled with this total disregard for lifestyle.’

The 78-year-old, who has lived in North Beach for half a century, said he was told about 47 trees would be cut down.

He said two tuarts, a sheoak and other Australian native trees had been removed so far.

‘Of the remainder under sentence, most are the magnificent tuarts about 20 to 30 years old with an expected life of 200 years,’ Mr Lee said.

‘Charles Riley Reserve was envisaged to be an asset enjoyed by the whole community, and not be the private property of any power groups.’

City of Stirling parks and reserves acting manager Graeme Fuller said the city sought to retain as many trees as possible when undertaking new works.

‘In total, 16,100 shrubs and 96 trees will be planted as part of the landscaping of the community parkland and car park,’ he said.

Mr Fuller said the extension of the car park required the war memorial, and the Lone Pine tribute
tree adjacent to it, to be moved.