Balga: Participants needed for falls prevention program

Wadjak Northside Aboriginal Community Centre, Curtin University and North Metropolitan Public Health Unit representatives with community members around the ironbark tree at the program launch.
Wadjak Northside Aboriginal Community Centre, Curtin University and North Metropolitan Public Health Unit representatives with community members around the ironbark tree at the program launch.

WADJAK Northside Aboriginal Community Centre is recruiting participants for its exercise program.

The Balga centre invites Aboriginal people aged 45 and older to be part of the Ironbark program, run by the centre, Curtin University, the North Metropolitan Public Health Unit and North Metropolitan Health Service.

Unit director Jo Fagan said more than 30 per cent of Aboriginal people in that age group experienced falls each year.

The program aims to improve balance, mobility, strength and confidence.

It includes weekly strength training exercises in a culturally safe environment.

University lead investigator Anne-Marie Hill said the exercises had physical and psychological benefits.

“Physical benefits include improving bone strength, muscle mass and reduced risk of falls,” she said.

“Psychological benefits include improved confidence and quality of life by socialising and learning new skills.”

To register, email jessica.carter@health.wa.gov.au or call 9380 7765.