City of Stirling looks to State Government for financial compensation over whale carcass

City of Stirling looks to State Government for financial compensation over whale carcass

THE CITY of Stirling has been left with a $170,000 bill to remove the decomposing whale carcass that washed up on Scarborough Beach on November 1.

The 17m, 30-tonne whale carcass lay decomposing on the beach for two days, attracting sharks and forcing beaches to be closed, before the City of Stirling was able to remove it.

It was then transported to the Tamala Park Recycling Centre in Mindarie where it was buried.

Cr Italiano said the State Government had a responsibility to financially assist the City for the costly clean-up.

‘Leaving ratepayers with the clean-up bill is not acceptable in my book and we will be seeking cost recovery from the State Government as well as insisting they develop an urgent mitigation strategy in consultation with all other involved agencies,’ Cr Italiano said.

Cr Italiano said he expected the State Government to develop a better response to any future dead marine life and wanted to see a more proactive approach from the State Government in the future.

‘The City would expect that a more proactive mitigation strategy is developed by the State Government as the lead agency on this matter with collective input from coastal local government authorities to better manage any such situation should it occur again,’ Cr Italiano said.

‘The City has no jurisdiction over the ocean, it only became the City’s responsibility for disposal when the whale carcass effectively beached at Scarborough beach late Sunday afternoon.’

The City also removed several tonnes of sand from the beach, which had been contaminated by oil from the decomposing whale.