End to fight over Perth dunes a ‘win for the environment’

Beach Not Bitumen members Philip Smith of Scarborough, Mike and Marilyn Needham of Sorrento, Marg Herring of Scarborough and Robyn Murphy of Marmion are pleased these Scarborough dunes have been reclassified. Photo: David Baylis
Beach Not Bitumen members Philip Smith of Scarborough, Mike and Marilyn Needham of Sorrento, Marg Herring of Scarborough and Robyn Murphy of Marmion are pleased these Scarborough dunes have been reclassified. Photo: David Baylis

THE end of a 20-year fight over Scarborough dunes is a “win for the environment”, says one of the campaigners.

A 3.3ha section of dunes once earmarked to extend The Esplanade north has been reclassified as part of the adjacent South Trigg Class A Reserve.

Community group Beach Not Bitumen formed in 2016 to fight against the then State Government’s plan to extend the road through the dunes.

The decision was later scrapped by Labor after the 2017 election.

In December, a developer sought to clear a section of the dunes for a firebreak in front of its planned beachfront apartments but the application was later withdrawn after community backlash.

Beach Not Bitumen spokeswoman Robyn Murphy said Landgate recently issued a Certificate of Title confirming the land reclassification, which gave the City of Stirling responsibility for its care, control and management.

“It has been a long time coming and is the culmination of more than 20 years of campaigning by local conservation groups, but now we can be confident that the coastal dune system between Scarborough and Trigg beaches will be protected forever,” she said.

“Class A reserves afford the greatest degree of protection for reserves of Crown land and is used to protect areas of high conservation value and regional significance.”

Ms Murphy said the land had been “under threat” from various proposals over many years.

“This is a win for the environment and for the community after years of campaigning to protect this important remnant Quindalup dune system at Scarborough and Trigg for future generations,” she said.

A threatened ecological community of Rottnest Island cypress pines, including two 100-year-old trees, was discovered at the site and given protection by the City of Stirling in 2017.

Tuart woodlands found in Trigg Bushland, on the other side of West Coast Highway, were this year listed as critically endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act and given national environmental protection.