Fears for safety on beach

Scarboro SLSC member Darryl Kelly with some of the limestone debris making its way down on to the beach. Picture: Dominique Menegaldo www.communitypix.com.au d396207
Scarboro SLSC member Darryl Kelly with some of the limestone debris making its way down on to the beach. Picture: Dominique Menegaldo www.communitypix.com.au d396207

SSLC safety officer Darryl Kelly said he had been in talks with the City of Stirling to get the limestone debris removed from the beach since January 2012 but as yet, nothing had been done.

‘Those rocks have been there ever since the wall was built,’ he said.

‘On the first of January in 2012, I started to notice there were a lot of rocks making their way to the beach in front of the surf club.

‘During the surf championships they realised they needed a stable access ramp, so they packed all this limestone rock material in and put soft sand soil over the top of it.

‘What’s happened since then is that just due to mother nature, all that sand has been eroded away and those limestone rocks are slowly but surely making their way down the beach.’

Mr Kelly said his primary concern was the safety of beachgoers, and accused the City of inaction over the issue.

‘That’s why the members are picking up the rocks and throwing them to the sand hills, we’ve been doing that consistently and regularly because we’re sick of waiting for council to pull their fingers out, come down here and do something about it.’

City of Stirling infrastructure director Geoff Eves said the City’s priority was stabilising the access ramp.

‘The City has performed maintenance on this ramp and surrounds on at least four occasions, the most recent being Thursday last week,’ he said.

‘What is needed now is to reconstruct the service track to the amphitheatre but to give consideration to a more substantial base and to have some means of containing the crushed limestone without spillage on to the beach.

Mr Kelly, however, said that addressing the track was not the number one priority.

‘The track isn’t the concern, it’s the limestone that’s made its way down to the beach,’ he said.