School independence day

Doubleview Primary School principal Greg Fisher with students, from left, Tim Hogan (Year 6), Blayd Turner (Year 7), Zoe Colmer (Year 6) and Meg Case (Year 7) [NAMES OK]
Doubleview Primary School principal Greg Fisher with students, from left, Tim Hogan (Year 6), Blayd Turner (Year 7), Zoe Colmer (Year 6) and Meg Case (Year 7) [NAMES OK]

Under the Independent Public School funding model, schools are given more control to allocate funding by the State Government, rather than the money being channelled directly into predetermined sectors.

Mr Fisher said he and others would look to surveys and community feedback to better direct money.

‘I think from a school perspective, we’ll have a bit more self-determination; we’ll be able to allocate the resources that we currently get in a more appropriate manner for our students’ needs,’ the principal said.

‘We’ll be able to use the resources more for the individual needs for the students at Doubleview Primary school so it will give us that flexibility.

‘We’re very happy. We’ll be joining other schools in the network who already are IPS, so I suppose when we all get together we’ll be speaking the same language and dealing with the same concerns and issues, so it makes it a bit more functional.’

Doubleview primary is one of 178 State schools to adopt the new funding model ahead of next year, bringing the State total to 442 ” 57 per cent of WA’s public schools.

Education Minister Peter Collier said the initiative would be one of the most significant education reforms in the State in decades.

‘WA is leading the way in giving local schools and communities more say and flexibility in the way they offer education to meet the needs of students,’ Mr Collier said.