Win for Scarborough residents and schools with LiquorLand proposal rejected

Residents’ group spokesman Grant Dingley with other residents unhappy about the proposed Liquorland superstore moving in near schools in Scarborough.  Picture: Andrew Ritchie
Residents’ group spokesman Grant Dingley with other residents unhappy about the proposed Liquorland superstore moving in near schools in Scarborough. Picture: Andrew Ritchie

IN what was described as a “David and Goliath” battle by locals, a proposed Liquorland across the road from a Scarborough school has been rejected.

Residents, St John’s Primary and Scarborough Primary school representatives were outraged about a Scarborough Beach road Liqourland when it was proposed mid-last year.

Scarborough Independent Primary School Board Chair Trisha Lee said she and other parents were pleased at the decision.

MORE: Bottleshop plan angers locals.

“We strongly felt the proposed location was much too close to schools and would have had a negative effect on our school community by exposing the children to excessive alcohol advertising,” she said.

“We were also concerned that providing easy access to alcohol nearby would increase the amount of vandalism and alcohol-related litter at our school.

“This is already a problem our school has to manage and we don’t want it increased any further.”

Ms Lee said school representatives raised concerns last year with Liquorland “several times” but they were dismissed.

“I think they worked the system as best they could not to get objections,” she said.

St John’s School principal Mary Bizzaca put forward an objection, referencing a British Medical Association study, which linked alcohol advertising to young people’s attitudes to drinking.

Ms Bizzaca submitted that a liquor store in full view of students in the schoolyard of a primary school, on a daily basis for eight years, might influence students to consume alcohol.

MORE: Battle lines drawn over bottle shop.

Liquor Licensing WA’s director stated the approval of the license would not be in the public interest.

“There are two primary schools in very close proximity to the applicant’s proposal,” the director said.

“I accept to some degree, the submission from Scarborough Primary School objectors that the Liquorland name and branding present…a form of advertising and will be associated with television and other alcohol advertising.”

Scarborough MLA Liza Harvey said a large number of constituents had contacted her about the application.

“I believe this decision will be welcomed by the large number of constituents who contacted my office, raising concerns about the potential of a liquor store operating from that location,” she said.

“It’s pleasing to see that this process has taken into account the views presented by the local community.”