Opinion: Tree removal concern for Karrinyup residents

I WRITE to you as a concerned citizen about the shock I got when I saw the mature trees being butchered at the Karrinyup Shopping Centre despite the tree canopy policy of the City of Stirling.

As far as I am concerned UniSuper and AMP Capital have no social licence to operate after their actions demonstrate how they “care” about the local people and the planet (biosphere).

Such developers’ greed for profits have (1) to stop and (2) be reversed (measurable ecological compensation measures).

Please note, you have my word that I will never again go shopping at the Karrinyup Shopping Centre or any centre that is associated with that group.

Let us put this aggressive act frankly: these actions are a crime on the planet and a disrespect to the people.

Planning decisions need to be made locally, i.e. by the people who live locally not by some faceless (external) investors who socialise their negative impacts on our world.

RAOUL ABRUTAT,

Wembley Downs

 

THERE were several passionate and intelligent questioners at December 3’s City of Stirling electors’ meeting looking for any help, support or guidance from the City of Stirling in regard to, among others, the ongoing razing of anything that even vaguely looks like it might dare produce a leaf or a bit of shade at the Karrinyup redevelopment site.

The City for its part answered with its usual unconvincing and tired ‘out of our hands/nothing we can do/not our job’ argument.

The City spends many a pretty penny of yours and mine on monitoring the ever-decreasing canopy in Stirling, creating canopy targets and non-binding unenforceable tree retention policies and talking a lot about the importance of, and need to protect, green space.

To the Doubleview International School of WA development – ‘not us, that’s the State Government’ – to the twin towers – ‘not us that’s the MRA’ – to the Karrinyup redevelopment – ‘not us, that’s the DAP (development assessment panel)’.

Councillors, why are the only people passionately trying to defend our amenity not the people sitting in council?

SIMON WHEELER,

Scarborough

 

AT a time when there is increasing research and discussion around urban heat island effect, where local governments ask (force?) residents to consider planting trees to mitigate the blinding heat of Australian summers, it is interesting that developers are pulling down large trees to make way for enormous heat captivating cement buildings that require huge amounts of energy to keep airconditioned year round.

Where are the local government officials and why aren’t they asking developers to mitigate the concrete jungles being erected in our suburbs?

Urban heat affects us all.

Walking towards a shopping centre in the height of a Perth summer, you can feel the heat emanating from the barren carparks and concrete building.

Surely this is where we need more, not less, trees.

Karrinyup Shopping Centre has lost enough trees in the redevelopment taking place.

Please make some noise to stop more being removed.

NICKEY LUDKINS,

Scarborough

 

I AM a resident in Karrinyup and am very excited to be finally getting a new shopping centre.

However, I believe that the tree removal that is planned for the site works is extreme and unnecessary, and indeed a recent change to the plan that was presented.

Perhaps a setback of 3m with all existing trees in that area maintained would be an idea to consider.

I feel that good development is all about compromise.

It takes but a couple of hours to irreversibly remove something that has taken many decades to reach the size of some of these.

A while of consideration for a better option is not much to ask for.

The better option by the way isn’t always the one with the biggest dollar sign by it.

BETH PROVAN,

Karrinyup

 

IT is deeply disturbing to see beautiful mature trees removed for the redevelopment of the shopping complex along Davenport Street and Francis Avenue in Karrinyup.

These trees take years to reach full maturity and replacing them with smaller trees does not cut it for me.

Bird life have relied upon them for protection, raising their young and foraging, and they provide shade and ambience for citizens.

It appears the City of Stirling says one thing regarding increasing tree canopy to residents but turns a blind eye to developers.

I urge the council take a stronger stance on this matter and perhaps retain some of the more mature trees.

EMILY WALLIS,

Wembley Downs

 

WELL there it is, page 5, Stirling Times, December 11.

Following questioning about the removal of 50 trees on the Karrinyup Shopping Centre redevelopment site, it is presented by both the director of infrastructure and director of planning that the council knew about the tree removal and were to receive a measly $30,000.

Over many years, the council’s cone of silence has permeated within council and its administration, treating ratepayers with absolute arrogance and contempt.

Then the council comes out and say “we care about trees”; what utter rubbish.

Look at the front of the council offices and council chamber: a concrete court yard with a moat around the council chamber.

To the front, some weeds in a garden.

ROBERT MITCHELL,

Karrinyup