Records about more than facts

Guinness World Records official Chris Sheedy in Ellenbrook. Picture: Bruce Hunt
Guinness World Records official Chris Sheedy in Ellenbrook. Picture: Bruce Hunt

Due to his presence, Ellenbrook Primary School and its recruited human trees were able to secure the record, for the largest gathering of people dressed as trees, on the spot.

Mr Sheedy said the fun and imagination showed during the Ellenbrook bid symbolised the spirit of Guinness.

‘Kids are generally more excited about a world record attempt than anybody, so to me getting hundreds of kids all together for an attempt is what Guinness is about,’ he said.

Last Wednesday was the launch day of the book’s 60th anniversary edition, which reflects on the history of records.

‘When the book was first published in 1955, man hadn’t been to the moon and you couldn’t make a trans-Atlantic phone call,’ Mr Sheedy said.

‘This is how much the world has changed in 60 years and it’s what makes the book so fascinating to me.

‘The 1955 release was full of dry facts like tallest mountain, fastest car. It was never intended to go into people’s homes ” it was intended to solve arguments in pubs.’

‘That year it took off and everyone wanted a copy, so from there, the more peculiar records like the tree one in Ellenbrook became a part of the book.’