Grandpa de deux: family affair in Don Quixote ballet

Alex Poor (74) and his granddaughter Iesha Poor (14) of Darch will both be dancing in Perth City Ballet's production of Don Quixote. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d448347
Alex Poor (74) and his granddaughter Iesha Poor (14) of Darch will both be dancing in Perth City Ballet's production of Don Quixote. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d448347
Alex Poor (74) and his granddaughter Iesha Poor (14) of Darch will both be dancing in Perth City Ballet's production of Don Quixote. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d448347 Alex Poor (74) and his granddaughter Iesha Poor (14) of Darch will both be dancing in Perth City Ballet's production of Don Quixote. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d448347

DESPITE their 60-year age gap, a love of dance is uniting two generations in Perth City Ballet’s production of Don Quixote this week.

Former professional dancer and musical theatre director and choreographer Alex Poor (74) is sharing the Quarry Amphitheatre stage with his 14-year-old granddaughter Iesha, of Darch.

Having travelled from the Gold Coast to take on the role of Gamache, Mr Poor will dance a minuet with Iesha in the first act.

“It is an honour for me to be on the same stage with my granddaughter,” he said. “It is going to be a lot of fun.”

Mr Poor’s career spanned 40 years, working in Perth, London and Hong Kong, and said it was great seeing Iesha at the start of hers.

“It’s so exciting for her and for me to see her develop,” he said.

“I’ve always kept an interest in what she’s done (and) so far she’s done exceptionally well.”

Iesha trains at Gail Meade Performing Arts Centre in Wangara and last year was awarded state champion as the top sub-elementary student in the CSTD major ballet exams.

She also appeared in Perth City Ballet’s 2015 production of Swan Lake.

“I’ve never really seen (my grandfather) dance before so that will be very interesting,” Iesha said.

“I am so excited to have this opportunity to be performing with him.”

Iesha said she trained five hours a day for the role but said it was worth it.

“All the hard work pays off,” she said. “I like the atmosphere; it’s a way you can express yourself to everyone.”

Taking on “fun roles” that require a small amount of dancing, Mr Poor said he kept fit with a weekly two-hour seniors’ tap dancing class and lots of walking, and was keen to continue performing.

“I’d like to be involved any way I can,” he said.

He also admitted to providing advice to Iesha, which she was happy to accept.

“I’m always saying ‘lift up your knee’ or some other correction,” he said. “Your training never leaves you.”

Don Quixote runs until January 16 at Quarry Amphitheatre in City Beach.