A landscape transformed

Wanneroo Hospital in 1980; bottom: the Shire of Wanneroo building (background) and the hospital in 1984. Pictures courtesy Picture Joondalup
Wanneroo Hospital in 1980; bottom: the Shire of Wanneroo building (background) and the hospital in 1984. Pictures courtesy Picture Joondalup

Anyone driving to either would remember the isolated, bushland setting and having to be alert so as not to miss the turn-off.

How times have changed.

The Shire of Wanneroo offices, built in 1979, are now home to the City of Joondalup with a new library and council chambers opened alongside in 1997.

Today’s modern Joondalup Health Campus bears no resemblance to the 85-bed public hospital opened as Wanneroo Hospital in 1980.

All signs of the small regional hospital disappeared by 1998 when the then Premier Richard Court opened the major community health facility with 265 public and 70 private beds, specialist medical centre and support services.

Premier Court described the expanded campus as ‘a triumph for the community.’

Now operated by Ramsay Health Care, the campus has grown again, into a 664-bed sub-tertiary facility with major redevelopment completed last year.

Facilities range from a new emergency department, 145-bed private hospital and ward block with 85 extra beds to 12 new operating theatres and new intensive care, high dependency and coronary care units.

In a nod to its history, the health campus named the 85-bed Wanneroo Wing in honour of the original Wanneroo Hospital.

Congratulating the Times on 40 years of keeping the community informed, chief executive Kempton Cowan said the region had seen remarkable change.

‘What was once the 85-bed Wanneroo Hospital is now a 664-bed medical campus with public and private facilities,’ he said.

‘For the community, this means most can be treated at Joondalup Health Campus instead of travelling into Perth.’