Call for change to carcass law

The whale carcass washed up at Pinnaroo Point with TV news crews looking on. Picture: Tom Forbes
The whale carcass washed up at Pinnaroo Point with TV news crews looking on. Picture: Tom Forbes

‘After a quick walk, we started to smell it and then we saw it,’ he said after sending the Weekender a photo.

A 9m rotting whale carcass had washed up at Pinnaroo Point, causing the City of Joondalup and Surf Life Saving WA to close the beaches at the end of Whitfords Avenue.

It had floated north after being seen about 13km off Scarborough last Thursday and again about 9km off Trigg Point on Friday. Joondalup Mayor Troy Pickard said the disposal of the carcass was led by the Department of Parks and Wildlife.

‘Aside from minor traffic management and netting expenses, all costs associated with the removal of the carcass were paid by the Department of Parks and Wildlife,’ he said.

‘It is my belief that changes should be made to federal legislation so that in future, whale carcasses in the ocean can be towed away from the Perth metropolitan coastline and are prevented from beaching near highly-populated areas.’

The carcass was taken to Tamala Park Waste Management Facility to be buried.