E-waste collection

File pic.
File pic.

It comes after more than 500 people dropped off about 18 tonnes of e-waste at the city’s June collection.

Sixty-five per cent of them were taking part in such a collection for the first time, with many previously storing their e-waste at home.

Two sea containers were filled with used computers, monitors, notebooks, printers, fax machines, scanners, CD |drives, hard drives, TVs, VCR players, DVD players, projectors, networking equipment, cables, keyboards, mice, floppy discs, printer cartridges, electronic games/toys, stereos, cameras, video cameras, iPods and MP3 players.

Joondalup Mayor Troy Pickard said this month’s collection was a chance for people who missed the June event to get rid of their unwanted TV sets, computers and computer equipment in an environmentally responsible way.

‘The collection will ensure that valuable resources such as tin, nickel, aluminium, copper, lead and mercury are recovered and re-used to keep old technology out of landfill, while preventing potentially hazardous materials from leaking into the environment,’ he said.

Participants can drop off their waste at the rear of the centre between 9am and 4pm (both days) and staff will be available to help lift bulky goods.

The city plans to have four e-waste collections a year to coincide with the removal of e-waste as an accepted item in the city’s bulk verge collections.

– Items not accepted for recycling: Microwaves, whitegoods, small appliances, vacuum cleaners, power tools, non-computer batteries.

Hosted in conjunction with Infoactiv and the Mindarie Regional Council, the event is part of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme, which aims to lift television and computer recycling from its current low rate to 80 per cent by 2021.