Easter lunar eclipse is nigh

Total eclipse of the moon at Old Perth Observatory captured by local astrophotographer John Goldsmith.
Total eclipse of the moon at Old Perth Observatory captured by local astrophotographer John Goldsmith.

Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are perfectly safe to watch with the naked eye.

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, earth and moon are all in a straight line in space with Earth in the middle.

Earth blocks out the light coming from the sun and what we see is earth�s shadow move across the face of the moon.

On Easter Saturday, April 4 the total lunar eclipse begins at 7.54pm and ends at 8.06pm. The direction to look is east.

Do you know why the date for Easter changes every year?

Easter Sunday is always the first Sunday after the full Moon, following the March equinox.

An equinox is when earth�s axis isn�t tilted toward the sun one way or the other and the hours of night and day are almost equal in length.

This year, the March equinox was on the 21st. The full moon after this date is on Saturday, April 4 and therefore Easter Sunday is the following Sunday, which is April 5.

There�s a special Easter Eclipse event on at Old Perth Observatory. For tickets visit www.stargazersclubwa.com.au/easter-eclipse or call Carol 0427 554 035.