Expo provides help for FIFO life

Clockwise from top left: Delys Griffin and Deb Reveley from Brain Ambulance. Ruth Murdoch from Acorn Life Path and Lori Jacobs from UWA’s School of Population Health. The This FIFO Life flashmob. Natalie Prowse and Sandy Davidson of Palmerston Association.
Clockwise from top left: Delys Griffin and Deb Reveley from Brain Ambulance. Ruth Murdoch from Acorn Life Path and Lori Jacobs from UWA’s School of Population Health. The This FIFO Life flashmob. Natalie Prowse and Sandy Davidson of Palmerston Association.

Mental Health Minister Helen Morton welcomed Mr Connor’s parents Peter and Anita Miller and spoke about the positive and negative sides of FIFO work before opening the expo.

‘It is fitting that the expo is held two days after World Suicide Prevention Day and one day after R U OK Day,’ she said.

Mrs Morton also launched This FIFO Life, a new resource to help give workers and families better access to information on where to get help.

‘The result is a fantastic website with blogs, articles and links about many different issues relating to mental health and FIFO workers,’ she said.

Program co-ordinators Sue Crock and Julie Loveny, who interviewed Mr Connor about FIFO work and depression days before he died, remembered him as a man loved and supported by many.

A flash mob then performed a dance routine to Pharrell Williams’ song Happy.

Exhibitors included services from backgrounds in mental health, counselling, men’s health, parenting, local government, relationships and financial management.

A $120,000 State Government grant helped develop the program.

Visit www.thisfifolife.com for more details.