Girrawheen youngsters get a lifesaving lesson on meningococcal


Childcare worker Tegan Cammeron-Dow helps her son Dewi (2) to wash his hands correctly.
Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au   d473147
Childcare worker Tegan Cammeron-Dow helps her son Dewi (2) to wash his hands correctly. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au d473147

THESE youngsters might not be able to spell meningococcal yet, but they certainly know how to avoid contracting it.

Children at Newpark Childcare Centre in Girrawheen were recently part of an Amanda Young Foundation-led push for greater awareness around hygiene from a young age.

Foundation spokeswoman Linda Ritchie outlined the importance of the initiative, known as Kiddy Canter.

“Children will talk with their parents and carers about what they learned,” she said.

“Often the knowledge of a few key symptoms is enough to give carers the confidence to seek urgent medical assistance before it’s too late.”

Meningococcal can kill within a day if not detected soon enough.

Symptoms include severe joint pain, vomiting and a distinct rash that resembles faint pinpricks before developing into purple blotches.

The foundation was set up in 1998 in memory of Amanda Young, who died of the disease at age 18.

Visit www.amandayoungfoundation.org.au for more information.

Meningococcal W vaccines available in Wanneroo

STUDENTS can receive the meningococcal W vaccine at a clinic in Wanneroo this month.

The City of Wanneroo will hold a clinic to administer catch-ups of the immunisation at Wanneroo Library and Cultural Centre on September 27.

It is open to students in years 10 to 12 or Tafe and university students aged between 15 and 19.

To book, call 9405 5000.

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