Hepburn Heights hero

From left: Marilyn Zakrevsky, Karl Rundle, Audrey Hine and John Hudson with the plaque inside Hepburn Heights honouring former councillor Norma Rundle. Pictures: Emma Reeves d413479
From left: Marilyn Zakrevsky, Karl Rundle, Audrey Hine and John Hudson with the plaque inside Hepburn Heights honouring former councillor Norma Rundle. Pictures: Emma Reeves d413479

A memorial plaque installed at the O’Leary Road entry to Hepburn Heights late last year recognises her efforts in helping save 38ha as public open space.

Mrs Rundle, a Wanneroo councillor from 1990 to 1994, died in September 2012 after battling emphysema and lung cancer. She was 69.

Joondalup City Council approved the plaque after an approach from Mrs Rundle’s husband Karl and her friend Audrey Hine. The pair, Friends of Hepburn Heights Bushland president John Hudson and members Marilyn and Ken Zakrevsky joined forces on the project.

‘The plaque commemorates Norma’s challenge in the Supreme Court in 1992 to the rezoning of Hepburn Heights to residential with her house as security and the risk of losing it if the case was lost,’ Mrs Zakrevsky said.

‘Norma was a very modest lady but I think she would have been proud as Karl is that she has been remembered.

‘Any campaign needs leaders and she was one of them.’

Mrs Hine, who perched herself in a tree despite the threat of bulldozers trying to clear the land in 1992, said retention of the bushland was a win for people power.

‘I want the public to know of this memorial at Hepburn Heights, bushland saved due to thousands of people from all walks of life,’ she said.

‘Marilyn did a great job with the memorial.

‘She and her family did a great deal of work with Norma all those years ago.’

The Friends of Hepburn Heights celebrates its 21st birthday on March 27.

Call John Hudson on 0427 017 131 to join the celebrations or buy a copy of Saving Hepburn Heights Bushland, by Alan Lloyd and Bill Marwick.

The 218-page soft-cover book includes personal experiences and details of events recounted through newspaper clippings ” many from Community ” letters, photographs and a timeline.