Joseph Banks Secondary College plugs into SchoolTV


Year 10 students Rachael Woodcock, Brooke Pattinson, Courtney Bell, Acting Principal Liz Smith, Jacinta Buckland, Kayla Woodcock and Donna Sanju. Picture: Martin Kennealey
Year 10 students Rachael Woodcock, Brooke Pattinson, Courtney Bell, Acting Principal Liz Smith, Jacinta Buckland, Kayla Woodcock and Donna Sanju. Picture: Martin Kennealey

A BANKSIA Grove school is helping parents support their children with issues like cyber bullying and internet addiction.

Joseph Banks Secondary College offers access to digital wellbeing platform SchoolTV, which provides parents with expert information and support regarding various problems their child may face.

Learning support co-ordinator Anita O’Brien said it was the first public school in WA to introduce the initiative that was aimed at helping parents raise safe, happy and resilient young people.

“It’s designed for parents to inform them and empower them in relation to their adolescents,” she said.

“They enjoy the fact we’re talking about these issues and offering professional support for them.”

The website features psychologist and author Michael Carr-Gregg, along with professionals from organisations including Headspace, the Alcohol and Drug Foundation and universities.

Parents can watch videos, read fact sheets, take a quiz and access links to outside resources to understand issues their child may be facing and how to help.

Acting principal Liz Smith believed parents would gain great value from each edition.

“Parents today face a multitude of modern day challenges in raising happy, well and resilient young people,” she said.

“While there is a great deal of information available, this can often be confusing and overwhelming for parents looking for guidance.

“SchoolTV is a new online resource designed to empower parents with credible and sound information with realistic, practical ongoing support strategies.”

Ms O’Brien said there had been a positive response from parents since launching the program this month.

“If parents have more information and children have the conversations we’re hoping we’ll have stronger and more resilient students with less issues,” she said.

Users are anonymous but the school can monitor if particular issues are accessed more than others and address these.

Parents can access the platform via the school’s website and newsletters.

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