Relay for recognition

Ningali Lawford Wolf, Dale Agius and students Teahl Taylor, Santana Taylor and Emily Lawford were part of the Journey to Recognition.
Ningali Lawford Wolf, Dale Agius and students Teahl Taylor, Santana Taylor and Emily Lawford were part of the Journey to Recognition.

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal campaigners will lead the Journey to Recognition relay to Neil Hawkins Park at 11am for a picnic hosted by the Northern Suburbs Reconciliation Group.

Mrs Green, who co-chairs the reconciliation group, said constitutional recognition would help heal some old wounds.

‘It would be wonderful because for so long we’ve been left out and I think something like this would be a wonderful step forward for Aboriginal people ” to feel that people do care and they want to do something about it. That’s my personal feeling. I just feel that it needs to happen,’ she said.

The Journey to Recognition began in Melbourne in May and has now travelled more than 15,000km, with teams walking, cycling, four-wheel driving and even canoeing for stints up to 10 days.

Kelsi Forrest, a young Noongar woman, is urging northern suburbs residents to bring their children to the Joondalup picnic.

‘It is our responsibility as young people to carry on the legacy of our parents and grandparents and those who have gone before us who have fought for what we have today,’ she said.

‘What some people may not know is that the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are under the age of 25. It is young people who will be the main people directly affected by constitutional recognition.’