Sorrento English teacher’s new novel ‘Saving Jazz’ is out now


Author Kate McCaffrey with year 11 students Olivia Fernandes,Bianca De Longis,Tess Dorrington and Eva Male.
Picture: Martin Kennealey
www.communitypix.com.au d455838
Author Kate McCaffrey with year 11 students Olivia Fernandes,Bianca De Longis,Tess Dorrington and Eva Male. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au d455838

KATE McCaffrey knows how to appeal to a young audience.

After all, she spends a great deal of her time inspiring teenagers to become more interested in literature.

An English teacher at Sacred Heart College, McCaffrey immerses herself daily in the literary world.

So it was far from a great stretch when she decided to take up writing herself.

It has been 10 years since her first young adult novel Destroying Avalon hit the shelves and with three more published between then and her new offering Saving Jazz, McCaffrey said she tried to write stories and characters that her teenage readers could relate to.

Her new book is no different, focusing on the dangers of social media and online bullying through the eyes of her main character, Jasmine Lovely.

Saving Jazz is about a house party that goes out of control,” she said.

“Jazz, from all appearances, has it all, the looks, intelligence and compassion.

“However, she finds herself the perpetrator of a horrible act, one that she struggles with daily.”

Not just for teenagers, McCaffrey said adults could also learn about the perils of the online world and the dangers it posed.

“I think it will appeal, although that’s probably the wrong word, to parents who don’t know about the existence of this world and definitely teachers who think it’s a conversation we need to have,” she said.

“The anonymity that the internet provided has been superseded with a lack of privacy.

“Where we once lived in fear of being bullied, we now live in fear of our mistakes being paraded around the world for everyone to see.

“Cyber bullying, in its various forms, is never going to go away and, in all of its forms, it can have devastating consequences.”

Saving Jazz is available from www.fremantlepress.com.au.