Stranger brings joy to Madeley teen with brain tumour after returning Nintendo Switch

Blake Stevenson (14) had a brain tumour removed and since surgery last year has used a Nintendo Switch to help with mobility in his right hand. He lost it recently and was to returned to him by a stranger. Picture: Andrew Ritchie.
Blake Stevenson (14) had a brain tumour removed and since surgery last year has used a Nintendo Switch to help with mobility in his right hand. He lost it recently and was to returned to him by a stranger. Picture: Andrew Ritchie.

WHAT may have seemed like an irrelevant gesture to a stranger has made Blake Stevenson’s life better.

The 14-year-old Madeley resident had surgery last year to remove a benign brain tumour which left him with an acquired brain injury and the right side of his body weak.

Unable to walk, Blake is in a wheelchair and has been regaining strength and mobility in his right hand by playing his Nintendo Switch.

So when the gaming console he got for his birthday in January went missing last week, the Ashdale Secondary College student was devastated.

After getting home from rehabilitation at Princess Margaret Hospital on Tuesday, Blake’s mother Fiona Stevenson put the Switch on the roof of the car before getting him out to take him inside.

Forgetting about the Switch on the roof, Mrs Stevenson drove off to get dinner.

It fell off the roof of the car on Wanneroo Road when a fellow driver saw it and stopped to pick it up before following Mrs Stevenson to give it to her.

While stopped in her car, the mother-of-three said she was approached by the man who gave her the Switch.

“I had completely forgotten about the Switch, it had been a big day,” she said.

“I was so shocked at what happened and I thanked him but I don’t think he realises how appreciative I was.

“Blake would have been devastated without it.

“It makes me feel that there is some good in the world and it shows my children that it’s not all bad, there are people willing to help strangers and go the extra mile.”

So appreciative of what the man did, Mrs Stevenson turned to Facebook and posted her thanks in a residents group in the hope the man would see it.

“You have no idea how much I appreciate what you did,” the post read.

“Thank you for showing my children that there are honest and caring people in the world.”