Trees a crowd at meeting

Kingsley and Greenwood Residents Association committee members Dave Blackburn, Diana Squires, Rebecca Joel, vice president Sonia Makoare, John Logan, Rainer Repke and Joondalup councillor John Chester celebrate their win at lot 971 Creaney Drive, Kingsley.
Kingsley and Greenwood Residents Association committee members Dave Blackburn, Diana Squires, Rebecca Joel, vice president Sonia Makoare, John Logan, Rainer Repke and Joondalup councillor John Chester celebrate their win at lot 971 Creaney Drive, Kingsley.

Residents opposing the sale of lot 971 Creaney Drive, a 10,000sq m block of land behind the Kingsley Tavern, filled the council meeting’s public gallery, with 16 of them submitting questions to the City and nine making public statements.

Cr Brian Corr said there was a ‘fair number of people’ at the council meeting given the ‘short notice that this was on tonight’s agenda’.

‘The agenda for the briefing session (June 10) for this meeting clearly states that it wasn’t on tonight’s agenda,’ he said.

In the report to councillors, City officers had recommended the council take no further action in relation to the 1977-signature petition opposing the sale of the land, which was presented to the City in June, 2013.

During public question time, a resident asked if it was unusual for a petition to ‘remain unactioned’ for a year.

Joondalup chief executive Garry Hunt said it was unusual but a second confidential report about the sale of the land was before the strategic financial management committee, so a decision on the petition could not move forward until the other had.

Other residents, including Cr John Chester’s wife Heather, spoke about how passionate the community was to save the trees on lot 971, how the people who signed the petition were well informed the money from the sale of the land would go towards funding the Joondalup performing arts centre and the land was earmarked for aged housing.

Many asked how City officers could recommend to ‘ignore’ 1977 residents’ objections.

A council document said not selling lot 917 ‘would be at a significant financial cost to the City’.

‘Loss of revenue would not only result from the funds that would have been generated by the sale of the site but also the loss of local government rates thereafter with regard to any area of the site proposed for a commercial type zoning,’ the document said.

‘As an area of lot 971 is being considered for development of housing for residents that are over the age of 55, an additional loss would be the lack of opportunity to create this type of housing in the locality of Kingsley.’

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