Wanneroo Rd site works stir debate about environmental impact on Lake Joondalup

The Wanneroo interchange project. Photo: Martin Kennealey
The Wanneroo interchange project. Photo: Martin Kennealey

MAIN Roads says its contractor has been working with the City of Wanneroo to meet environmental requirements for a Wanneroo Road site office near Lake Joondalup.

Wanneroo councillors raised concerns about the environmental impact of the facility at 1351 Wanneroo Road while considering a development application for it at their February 5 meeting.

Acknowledging the facility was already in place, Cr Dot Newton said she hoped having it close to the construction site would speed up the process of works.

Main Roads spokesman Dean Roberts said staff and CPB Contractors would use it as a site office for the Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive construction workforce.

“Our contractor has worked closely with the City of Wanneroo, providing all information and documentation regarding environmental management of the area ensuring the council’s environmental requirements have been met,” he said.

Wanneroo Road widening works. Picture: Martin Kennealey d490642

“A bund will be installed around the office facilities to capture stormwater runoff, restricting flow into the lake or regional park – the bund is designed to retain rainfall from a one in 100 year storm event.”

A council report said the site fell within a special control area, but the public works were not located in the wetland buffer area.

It said the temporary nature of the development did not require a midge management plan, but recommended that all wastewater be contained onsite and not discharged into the environment, and that water storage facilities be sealed.

“We will not be storing stagnant open bodies of water; all water tanks will be sealed,” Mr Roberts said.

“Lake Joondalup holds stagnant water for most of the year and this body of water has been a large source of midge and mosquito infestation in the area for many years.”

Cr Samantha Fenn raised concerns about the material used on the site, and said not enough measures were taken to evaluate the environmental impact before work started.

Cr Paul Miles said he was concerned about “used bitumen” laid as asphalt on the site, and whether vehicles would be serviced and refuelled there.

Mr Roberts said material removed in road profiling was used for the pad, which would house temporary offices, a car park and equipment storage.

“Refuelling will be undertaken from a small service truck – fuel will not be stored on site,” he said.

“Minor repairs will be undertaken on site; major repairs will be taken off site.”

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Mr Roberts said steps to avoid contamination included using spill trays, refuelling at least 30m from a waterway, not storing hazardous material in a bund area, weekly inspections and routine maintenance.

The site access is currently on a crossover and the interchange project includes creating a four-way intersection at Clarkson Avenue, which will have traffic signals.

The majority of councillors voted in favour of advising the WA Planning Commission that the City supported the temporary development, with three voting against it.

The council considered a separate report about Wanneroo Road dual carriageway upgrades at the February 5 meeting, and agreed to changes planned by Main Roads regarding control of access.

The changes transfer responsibility for portions of road between Joondalup Drive and Hester Avenue to Main Roads.

They also transfer old sections of Wanneroo Road that are now service roads to local road status, making the City responsible for future maintenance.

Mr Roberts said the Wanneroo Road widening project between Joondalup and Flynn drives was on track to finish by April, and delays had not affected the overall cost.

“Delays were incurred in mid-2018 when extremely wet weather impacted upon the laying of road pavement,” he said.