City of Kwinana slams State Government’s transport plan

City of Kwinana slams State Government’s transport plan

THE City of Kwinana has criticised the State Government’s draft transport plan for 3.5 million people, calling it a “wish list” of infrastructure projects that “may or may not be” adopted by future governments.

It was also disappointed that the draft plan, announced by former transport minister Dean Nalder in August, was lacking in any long-term foresight, particularly regarding the Western Trade Coast and outer harbour projects.

Mr Nalder said the plan had been developed over two years to ensure Perth’s bus network, rail links, roads and cycleways grew to cater for for an extra 1.4 million people.

He said it had been Perth’s most comprehensive transport plan in two decades.

In a submission to the Department of Transport that was endorsed by the council on Wednesday night, the City said the outer harbour port was a necessary piece of strategic infrastructure that would “unlock the economic potential” of WA.

MORE: Canning Council submits response to transport plan

“Industrial development within the Western Trade Coast is reliant upon efficient road, rail and port access,” it said.

“The delivery of the outer harbour is pivotal for business to make the capital investment in establishing industries in this area.

“Industries are on record as stating that trading through Fremantle Port is impacting their international competitiveness.”

The submission said certainty was required about the timing of construction of the outer harbour so that it could be factored into businesses’ 10 and 20-year planning.

“The City is therefore disappointed that the draft transport plan identifies a delay to the development of the outer harbour and intermodal facility until the population reaches 3.5 million,” it said.

The submission said there appeared to be no detail in the plan to show how projects would be delivered and funded, describing it “more as a wish list of infrastructure projects that may or may not be picked up by future governments”.