Financial opportunities with HMAS Stirling

Financial opportunities with HMAS Stirling

SPRUIKING the benefits of future financial opportunities with HMAS Stirling this week was Head of Navy Capability, Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead.

Rear Admiral Mead spoke at a breakfast held at the Cruising Yacht Club on Tuesday to local and state businesses and government representatives looking to boost their bottom line.

He said there had never been so many announcements for Defence projects since World War II.

“It is exciting times to be in and associated with the Navy right now,” he said.

He outlined some of the projects including a $3 billion project building 12 offshore patrol vessels: 10 to be built in Henderson and two in Adelaide.

Also earmarked for Henderson were 21 Pacific Patrol boats and two offshore tankers.

He said significance of these projects was that there would be two continuous shipbuilding projects, a major in South Australia and a minor in Henderson.

He said that although French firm DCNS had won the $50 billion contract, the submarines would primarily be sustained in Henderson.

“This ship program is so fundamental that it will re-shape what Navy does. We are doing a lot of work right now working out where we want to move our fleet out to 2040,” the admiral said.

“With six subs – and we need to work out where we want them in Australia – there is no doubt Stirling will play a key role in that.

He said effective project management would involve everyone. “In order to make it work the only way is if defence, industry and community work together: we can’t do it by ourselves,” he said.

“We in Navy look forward to a relationship with the local community here, including the 350 contractors that cross the causeway every day.”

Other speakers included HMAS Stirling manager David Marshall and Marnie O’Donnell from the base’s facility management contrator, Augility.

He spoke of day-to-day operations and small to mid-sized projects upwards of $15 million to $50 million.

The main requirement involved security starting with police clearances to work at Garden Island. “We knock back about a third of applicants. Although we don’t include minor traffic offences… there are background checks,” Mr Marshall said.

To register your interest and find out more about upcoming Defence contracts, visit www.|tenders.gov.au. However, if unsuccessful with a tender there is a de-briefing process that Ms O’Donnell encouraged people to use.

“We will work through the process with you to understand why you didn’t get it,” she said.

“It’s about understanding the contract.”